The tree I would most like to party under is Larix x marschlinsii

To stand under  a full grown specimen can provoke a desire to twist strings of fairy lights,  hang lanterns and have a party.

The branches of Larix x marschlinsii  sweep and curve downwards and act as a giant awning.  And the space beneath this is large and beautiful, prompting a peering up through the undersides of branches.  Fishbones of branchlets and old cones dangle down

A close cousin of the Japanese larch and so it does the typical larch thing –  shifting to   crispy golden in autumn.    The cones are wonderful:  carmine pink in spring turning green over the summer.  Flowers are sulpherous yellow and dangle from twiggy branches softened by tufts of glaucous needles.

It is a gracious tree – big and stately and needs to stand  alone in rolling acres.  Parkland would be the best setting.   So how exactly do you conduct a love affair with a tree that is way too big to fit into your garden?  Simple.  Adopt one.

At Edinburgh Botanic Gardens they have just such a scheme.  Pay and take the tree for 5 years.  Well, take as a metaphor.  Adopter comes to the tree with a plaque that gives a little personal information.    The tree will be around for a long time but you can put your mark on its bark for a slice of time that will show up in its growth rings.  A neat solution for people like me who suffer from covetous tree habits.