Plantaholic POST:

The only drawback to this juicy green and practically white flower is the name.  Schizostylis coccinea ‘Pink Marge’. It has never grown well for me  but looks dreamy right now in a customer’s free-draining garden.   Cohabiting with the black grass Ophiopogon planascapus ‘Nigrescens’ and a shimmery grass Molinia caerulea ‘Edith Dudszus‘. Please do follow…

Choosing plants for a new planting scheme: some handy tips

There are a few rules that you should keep returning to.   Consider the effects of foliage,  form and texture.   Treat the exercise like decorating a room or flower arranging.  Think what goes together.  For leaves a mixture of large blades and strap leaves, some upright will be much more interesting. Please do follow…

St Catherine’s Hill and St Cross

The top of the hill was an Iron Age fort.  Stand there and look around.  The beech woods slide down the earthworks and delve you down into the valley of the river Itchen.  Tributaries of chalk streams of the tickled brown trout and some of the best fly-fishing in England.  Behind the hill the traffic…

Grave places

used to completely creep me out.   Now I love a good graveyard.   It’s probably an age thing.   Hidden away there are  numinous and peaceful places that are worth seeking out to sit in and be still.  Down an alleyway off one of the shopping streets in Woodbridge there is a worn brick…

Get naked at David Austin: some useful rose info

The leaves are off, or nearly, and  I’m taking my mind  back to David Austin and February.  I went there for a day’s course on designing with roses run by the inexorable Diana Perry, fount of rose lore.  Due to dog trauma (another story altogether) I did not write a blog log but  now I…

Best/worst front gardens – series 3

I rate this garden ***  (largely due to snappily clipped yew) Ratings explained: *       Call for a skip **     Concrete over it ***    Covet it ****  I’d sling my hammock here ***** In my wildest dreams Please do follow us!

Plantaholic Post

Malus John Downie – the small crabapple with the cherriest of fruit.   We are about to plant an avenue of these trees on a hilltop (if you can call a Suffolk rise in the ground that).  A wildflower meadow has been seeded around them. Please do follow us!